Why Study in China

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China

Witness Developments Made by China

These days, it’s hard not to pay attention to China. By 2030, China is already predicted to be the most powerful economy in the world by all measures. In just a few decades, the country has become one of the major global players and a force to contend with. A couple of years ago it even managed to overtake the United States as the largest economy in the world, at least if you look at purchasing power.

Typically whenever China is mentioned, it quickly becomes about the numbers, whether it’s GDP, population, how long China has been around or how many characters there are in the Chinese language. And let’s face it, these numbers are a big part of what makes China what it is. What we want to talk about in this post, however, is how these numbers relate to YOU – if you’re someone who is thinking about studying in Asia, and considering whether China would be a good place to go.

Future-proof your career by understanding the world’s largest population

It does if you look at the maths. With 1.4 billion inhabitants, China is the world’s most populated country. Out of the about 7 billion people living on this planet, 20 %are Chinese. Think about that.

This is a country and population that because of sheer immensity will influence industries like e-commerce, tourism, and education, especially as income levels rise and more and more people gain access to the internet.

Explore one of the world’s oldest civilizations

The Great Wall is one of the most appealing attractions in the world.

We look at China’s current achievements and plans like these 30 massive infrastructure projects and may well feel some sort of awe at their industriousness. But in looking at the present, we shouldn’t overlook the past.

China’s history is almost as long and continuous as the Great Wall of China itself. While written records date back to 1600 BCE, the origin of the Chinese civilization is often cited to reach back as far as to 5000 BCE. Some of the innovations that we commonly use even today such as paper, printing press, the compass, and gunpowder were all invented in China before Europeans knew about them.

China has had a huge influence on the whole surrounding region. To understand China is to understand East Asia in general. Confucianism has shaped China, Korea, and Japan for over 2000 years. The Chinese writing system has also spread to Japan, where Chinese characters are used alongside original Japanese characters. Up until the 20th century, Chinese characters were also used in Korea and Vietnam.

When you study in China, you get to step into this current of ancient history running just below the surface, influencing everything you see.

An immense number of places to see and discover

Because China is so geographically vast, it has an astounding variety of climates, cultures, and landscapes. Whether you want to hit the beaches, scale a mountain, hike in a desert or go skiing, you can do all of this within China. From Beijing’s Forbidden City and the Great Wall in the north to the green mountains and rice terraces of the Guangxi province in the southwest, there’s no shortage of both natural and man-made wonders to see.

Each of China’s geographical regions also has its own distinct culture, from dialects and traditional costumes to cuisine. When you get to know China on a deeper level, a fascinating patchwork of people and lifestyles reveals itself to you.

Learn the world’s most spoken language

1.4 billion Native speakers make Mandarin Chinese the most spoken language in the world. That automatically makes it worth learning. And it’s useful outside of China as well: Mandarin is spoken in Taiwan and Singapore too, not to mention all the 50 million ethnic Chinese living across the globe.

It’s not just that Chinese is useful for practical purposes, but learning it teaches you a whole new way of thinking. First off, you’ll start to think in pictures. To be fluent you have to memorize at least 3000 different characters, which is no easy task.

Scholarships Programs by the Chinese Government

  1. Bilateral Program

This includes full or partial scholarships in accordance with the educational exchange agreements or consensus between the Chinese government and governments of other countries, institutions, universities or international organizations. It supports undergraduate students, graduate students, general scholars and senior scholars.

Applicants shall apply to the dispatching authorities for overseas study of their home countries.

  1. Chinese University Program

This is a full scholarship for designated Chinese universities and certain provincial education offices in specific provinces or autonomous regions to recruit outstanding international students for graduate studies in China. It only supports undergraduates, postgraduate students, and doctoral students.

Applicants shall apply to the designated Chinese universities undertaking this program.

  1. Great Wall Program

This is a full scholarship for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to sponsor students and scholars in developing countries to study and research in China. It only supports general scholars and senior scholars.

Applicants shall apply to the National Commissions for UNESCO in their home countries.

  1. EU Program

This is a full scholarship to encourage students from EU member countries to study and research in China in order to promote mutual understanding between China and EU members. It supports undergraduate students, graduate students, general scholars, and senior scholars.

Applicants shall apply to the Office for Education and Culture, Mission of the P. R. China to the European Union.

  1. AUN Program

This is a full scholarship for the ASEAN University Network (AUN) to sponsor students, teachers and scholars from ASEAN member nations to study in China and to enhance the academic exchange and mutual understanding between China and ASEAN members. It only supports graduates.

Applicants shall apply to AUN Secretariat.

  1. PIF Program

This is a full scholarship to sponsor students from Pacific island countries to study in China. It supports undergraduates, graduates, general scholars, and senior scholars.

Applicants shall apply to Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) Secretariat.

  1. WMO Program

This is a scholarship for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to sponsor international students to study and conduct research in meteorology, hydrology, and water resources supervision and management in China. It only supports undergraduates and graduates.

Visa process for a student in China

Students who intend to study in China need to apply for a visa. Foreign students studying in China are required to hold an ordinary passport and either an X1 visa (study period of more than 180 days) or an X2 visa (study period of no more than 180 days.).

Applicants should apply for a Chinese visa from their nearest Chinese Embassy or Consulate.

Types of Chinese Visa

Please note: If you intend to study in China, only the following three categories of visas are appropriate for you.

X1 visa is issued to those who intend to study in China for a period of more than 180 days.

Documentation required:

  1. Original passport with at least six months of remaining validity and blank visa pages, and a photocopy of the passport’s data page and the photo page if it is separate.
  2. One completed Visa Application Form with a recently-taken color passport photo (bare-head, full face) against a light background attached.
  3. Proof of legal stay or residence status (applicable to those not applying for the visa in their country of citizenship)
  4. Original and photocopy of the Admission Letter issued by a school or other entities in China.
  5. Original and photocopy of “Visa Application for Study in China” (Form JW201 or Form JW202).

Besides the documentation mentioned above, other documents might be required by visa officers in order to decide whether to issue the visa on a case by case basis.

X2 visa is issued to those who intend to study in China for a period of no more than 180 days.

Documentations required:

  1. Original passport with at least six months of remaining validity and blank visa pages, and a photocopy of the passport’s data page and the photo page if it is separate.
  2. One completed Visa Application Form with a recently-taken color passport photo (bare-head, full face) against a light background attached.
  3. Proof of legal stay or residence status (applicable to those not applying for the visa in their country of citizenship)
  4. Original and photocopy of Admission Notice issued by a school or other entities in China.

Besides the documentation mentioned above, other documents might be required by visa officers in order to decide whether to issue the visa on a case by case basis.

Residence Permit

The “Exit and Entry Administration Law of the People’s Republic of China” came into force as of July 1, 2013.

Foreign students should pay attention to the following changes:

  1. The applicant for Residence Permit must make an application IN PERSON at the police station EVERY TIME when applying for the Residence Permit.
  2. Calculation of the Residence Permit: Applicant must make application 30 days before the expiry date (i.e. make an application about 40 days with your university before the expiry date). Even if you apply much earlier than the expiry date, the police officers will only calculate the new expiry date according to the current expiry date. (This is very beneficial to international students.)
  3. The Visa/Residence Permit of Study Type: the minimum duration applied for is 180 days (half a year). You may apply for once a short time visa (S Type Visa; less than 180 days) when you finish your study here and go back to your home country.
  4. Only X1 Visa is eligible to apply for a student’s Residence Permit. Other types of visas are not applicable in this case. X2 Visa is used for leaving China only; cannot be converted into other types of visa.
  5. No matter any of your relatives comes to visit you, you should report to the Police Station; if there is no significant/serious reason of leaving China, no report is required when your relative leaves China. Dropping-out or quitting-school students must report to the Police Station when leaving China.
  6. Part-time Work: foreign students are permitted to do part-time work in China now. The university should issue a Consent Letter; the hiring unit/company should issue a Certification; the police station will then mark on your visa “Part-time-work; Part-time-study”. The hiring unit/company cannot be changed; expect high amount of fine if you violate this law.
  7. Illegal Residence: you will be charged RMB¥500/day, maximum RMB¥10,000 of charge, or, more than 5 days but less than 15 days of detention.
  8. The Visa & Residence Permit processing time is longer now. You will probably get your passport again 20 days after you make the application

Cities

  1. Beijing
  2. Shanghai
  3. Hangzhou
  4. Chengdu
  5. Jiangxi

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